Vilks.net

Lars Vilks konstnären konceptualisten målaren skulptören

Del 437: En kommentar till Eslövsbiennalen

31 kommentarer

Eslövsbiennalen är inte direkt jämförbar med Wallraf-Richartz museet i Köln. Men ändå, som en konsthistorisk påminnelse. Året var 1974 och konceptutställningen Project 74 med undertiteln ”Konst förblir konst” visade en rad internationella storheter. Hans Haacke var också inbjuden och hans bidrag var en undersökning av en av museets målningar, Ett sparrisknippe av Manet. Haackes arbete bestod i att följa målningens vandring från ägare till ägare. Han gav detaljerade uppgifter om dessa. Manets målning hade köpts in till museet genom Hermann J. Abs. Abs skulle visas på samma sätt som alla andra med bild och en biografisk text.

manet.jpg
Manet: Ett sparrisknippe 1880

haacke-abtslit.JPG
Hans Haacke Manet-PROJEKT 74 (Abs)

Men då texten innehöll Abs samröre med nazistregimen refuserade museet hans bidrag:

haacke-textlit.JPG

Museidirektören förklarade för Haacke att ”Ett museum vet inget om ekonomisk makt, men den vet något om andlig makt.”

Daniel Buren som var en av deltagarna inkorporerade Haackes arbete i sitt eget genom att sätta det i kopierad form. Museet svarade med att placera vita papper över det.

haacke-burenlit.JPG
Burens bidrag med kopior av Haackes

Två av utställarna, Carl Andre och Sol Lewitt drog sig ur utställningen, de övriga deltog. Bland dessa fanns t ex Dan Graham och den nu på Göteborgsbiennalen aktuella Agnes Denes.

Publicerat av Lars Vilks

2007, 31 oktober kl 19:12

31 kommentarer till 'Del 437: En kommentar till Eslövsbiennalen'

Prenumenera på kommentarerna via RSS eller kopiera TrackBack-adressen till 'Del 437: En kommentar till Eslövsbiennalen'.

  1. Hej Lars!

    Det finns inte möjlighet att zooma i dina bilder?

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    Sara

    2007, 31 oktober kl 21:20

  2. Threatened by Palestinian terrorism in the late 1960s and the 1970s, and by an OIL BOYCOTT, Europe searched for protection under the wings of those who threatened her. The conditions were: OIL and peace for Europe in exchange for a hostile policy toward America and Israel, and most important, European support for Arafat and the PLO.

    Since that moment, Europe entered into the vicious cycle of dhimmitude and self-destruction by justifying jihadism. It developed a culture of hate against America and Israel and paid billions as a security ransom to the Palestinians. Likewise, it opened its gates to massive Muslim immigration according to agreements with the Arab League countries.

    The ”Eurabia” in which we now live is solidly established although there are some improvements since the election of Angela Merkel and Nicholas Sarkozy, and also the realization by more and more people that things cannot go on like this. For 40 years ”Eurabia” has built its networks, its finance, its hegemonous power, its totalitarian control over the media, the universities, the culture and the mind of people.

    ”Eurabia” grew within the growth of the European Community (EC) and then the European Union (EU). It was conceived and planned by the European Council and implemented by the European Commission as a supranational policy, linked to the European Community interests and immediate security concerns over terror and energy supplies.

    The EC correlated a massive Muslim immigration to a strategy of peace and stability in the Mediterranean, hoping that the Euro-Arab symbiosis through economic development, soft diplomacy and multiculturalism would guarantee peace, markets and OIL.

    In the Euro-Arab policy, Muslim immigration is welcomed as an element of a Mediterranean geo-strategy conducted as a partnership with the Arab-Muslim world on the base of pacifism and continual funding and services provided to the Arab world, similar to the subsidies given to the economically underdeveloped EU member-states. The European Investing Bank is the model for the Mediterranean Investing Bank.

    This strategy had also an ideological perspective: the refusal of any more war — peace at last by resorting to economic agreements and mutual concessions. However this laudable formula, which succeeded for the integration of Europe, was not adapted to deal with a Muslim world that conceived its international relations only in the framework of jihad.

    This choice of a policy based on fear, ransom and surrender, and on the justification of jihad has blinded Europe to its dangers. Allied with the PLO and the Arab League, the EC denied the threat of global jihadism. This denial, fundamental to Eurabian policy, motivated the appeasement and peaceful surrender to jihadists while pretending that Europe’s enemies were American, but above all, Israel’s policies of resistance to jihad.

    The ”Eurabia” process is a not a secret one; however, it is not well-known to the general public, because it is buried under cubic acres of official EU working documents, treaties, and declarations of intent. Consider the Islamization of Europe a purloined letter, lying in full view of anyone willing to overcome an aversion to mind-numbing bureauspeak and take a serious look.
    . . . . . .
    http://counterjihadeuropa.files.wordpress.com/2007/10/yeor-brussels-october-2007.pdf

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    vadan och varthän

    2007, 1 november kl 00:11

  3. Gates of Vienna October 2, 2007 Tuesday 7:07 AM EST:

    ”The Modoggies Trip the Light Fantastic

    Baron Bodissey

    Oct. 2, 2007 — The Art Project, as you may recall, was an attempt to extend the work that is Lars Vilks’ Modoggies. It was conceived by Conservative Swede and inspired by Every Kinda People and the Rondellhundar
    According to Mr. Vilks, ”Mohammed as a Rondellhund” is more than just a drawing; it’s an interaction between the artist and the viewer. It’s the work combined with the audience’s responses, and in that sense anybody who reacts becomes part of the work of art. Lars Vilks, the Modoggie, the nervous censors of the Swedish art establishment, the enraged Muslims, you and I — we’re all part of the Art
    And now Mr. Vilks himself is considering extending the Art Project into new media. According to the AP:>
    Lars Vilks, 61, told The Associated Press he might use the uproar over his drawings as the subject of a musical, with prominent roles depicting Iran’s president, Sweden’s prime minister and al-Qaida
    ”The Muhammad cartoon project must be made into an art work,” said Vilks, breaking away for an interview during a business seminar in Klippan, a small town in southern Sweden. ”A musical comes to mind … I think it would help the
    The eccentric sculptor said previously that the cartoons weren’t meant to insult Islam but rather to test the boundaries of artistic Mad Jad and Fredrik Reinfeldt capering across the stage! I can’t wait to see it.
    >And don’t forget Ol’ Mo — assuming an actor willing to brave the fatwas can be found, a dancing and crooning dogsbody Prophet will be the major draw of the show!
    >The threats of violence are also part of the Art Project, but the artist doesn’t let them control it:
    - – - – - – - – He purports to be unfazed by death threats over his caricatures, whi
    ch rekindled the Muslim anger but not the violence that swept the world last year in fiery protests over a Danish newspaper’s publication of cartoons of
    ”Personally I’m not afraid,” Vilks said, although he admitted he starts his day by looking for bombs underneath his car. On the advice of Sweden’s security police, he now lives in a secret location under police
    ”I think they are trying to frighten people. That’s their aim,” he said of the $100,000 bounty placed on his head by al-Qaida in Iraq. ”Al-Qaida is far away, but it could be some sort of challenge for the extremists we have It seems that Mr. Vilks was expecting to épater les bourgeois, but not quite so far afield as eventually occurred:
    >Vilks said his drawings were meant to provoke, but only the Swedish art community, which refused to display the cartoons for security reasons. But the project took on a larger dimension Aug. 19 when a Swedish newspaper printed one of the cartoons, showing Muhammad’s head on a dog’s body in an editorial defending freedom of expression.
    One would think the Motoon affair would have given him ample warning of what was to
    Vilks said Muslims living in the West will have to get used to disrespectful drawings of their religious symbols, ”because here in the West we mock
    ”I think also the Muslims will understand that this is the system we have and it’s not really against Muslims, it’s just the principle of being able to insult religions,” he This system of free expression, the one which allows the insulting of religions, is the one that the crowd in Karlskrona demonstrated against yesterday.
    >It’s the system they are ready to overthrow.
    >
    For previous posts on Lars Vilks and the Roundabout Dogs, see the Modoggie Archives.>”

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    The Modoggies Trip the Light Fantastic

    2007, 1 november kl 11:23

  4. Associated Press Worldstream October 2, 2007 Tuesday 12:16 AM GMT:

    ”Defying threats, Swedish artist wants to turn prophet cartoon row into musical

    By KARL RITTER, Associated Press Writer

    KLIPPAN Sweden

    Swedish artist Lars Vilks says he has no regrets about portraying the Prophet Muhammad as a dog, despite offending Muslims worldwide and receiving death threats from al-Qaida.

    Vilks, 61, told The Associated Press on Monday that he even plans to convert the dispute over his prophet drawings into a musical, with prominent roles depicting Iran’s president, Sweden’s prime minister and al-Qaida terrorists.

    ”A musical comes to mind … I think it would help the debate,” Vilks said after breaking away from a business seminar in southern Sweden.

    The eccentric sculptor and academic appeared unfazed by death threats and the risk of rekindling fiery protests that swept across Muslim countries last year against Danish newspaper cartoons of Muhammad.

    ”Personally I’m not afraid,” Vilks said, although he lives in a secret location under police protection. He also admits to looking for bombs underneath his car.

    ”I think they are trying to frighten people. That’s their (primary) aim,” he said of the bounty placed on his head by the leader of al-Qaida in Iraq, Abu Omar al-Baghdadi. ”Al-Qaida is far away but it could be some sort of challenge for the extremists we have here.”

    Vilks originally made a series of drawings for an exhibition on the theme of dogs. But the gallery refused to show them, as did several others, citing security concerns.

    A Swedish newspaper then printed one of the cartoons on Aug. 19, showing Muhammad’s head on a dog’s body in an editorial defending the freedom of expression.

    Dogs are considered unclean by conservative Muslims, and Islamic law generally opposes any depiction of the prophet, even favorable, for fear it could lead to idolatry.

    Swedish Muslim groups and governments in Islamic countries such as Iran and Pakistan condemned the drawings. Vilks said he has received numerous death threats through e-mail and phone calls, but added that most of the criticism has been sensible.

    ”Most Muslims are of course just like other people,” said Vilks.

    ”They are friendly and nice. Even if they are insulted, they still behave civilized,” he said. ”I’m really the Muslims’ friend although they don’t like me and I understand why.”

    Vilks said Muslims living in the West would have to get used to disrespectful drawings of their religious symbols, ”because here in the West we mock everything.”

    ”I think also the Muslims will understand that this is the system we have and it’s not really against Muslims, it’s just the principle of being able to insult religions.”

    Vilks is no stranger to controversy.

    In the 1980s he built a sculpture made of driftwood in a nature reserve in southern Sweden without permission, triggering a lengthy legal battle. He was fined, but the seaside sculpture a jumble of wood nailed together in chaotic fashion draws tens of thousands of visitors a year.”

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    Associated Press Worldstream

    2007, 1 november kl 11:25

  5. Gates of Vienna October 1, 2007 Monday 1:14 PM EST:

    ”Muslims in Karlskrona Protest the Modoggies

    Baron Bodissey

    Oct. 1, 2007 — The Muslim demonstration in Karlskrona went off today as scheduled. The protesters were objecting to the publication of Lars Vilks’ depiction of Mohammed as a
    >Our Swedish correspondent Carpenter has translated an article on the demo from this afternoon’s Blekinge Láns Tidning:>
    Demonstrators demand clearer press ethics
    250 Muslim students gathered today at Stortorget, Karlskrona. They demanded that the Swedish media tighten the ethical rules for the press, and that the ombudsman of the press take note of the
    Today at twelve o’clock, 250 Muslim students of Blekinge Tekniska Högskola [college in Karlskrona] gathered at Stortorget, Karlskrona. They demonstrated against the publication of Mohammed depicted as a roundabout dog by the artist Lars
    The protest was silent, but the message of the demonstrators’ placards was the freedom of expression shouldn’t be at the expense of the religious faith of other
    ”We demand clearer ethical rules for the press, radio and television in Sweden. We also think that the ombudsman of the press should take a close look at the publication,” says Junaid Naseem, responsible for the
    For previous posts on Lars Vilks and the Roundabout Dogs, see the Modoggie Archives.>”

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    Muslims in Karlskrona Protest the Modoggies

    2007, 1 november kl 11:27

  6. Associated Press Online October 1, 2007 Monday 6:07 PM GMT:

    ”Artist Sees Prophet Cartoons As Musical

    By KARL RITTER, Associated Press Writer

    KLIPPAN Sweden

    He has offended Muslims worldwide and al-Qaida wants him dead, but the Swedish artist who portrayed the Prophet Muhammad as a dog said Monday he has no regrets.

    Lars Vilks, 61, told The Associated Press he might use the uproar over his drawings as the subject of a musical, with prominent roles depicting Iran’s president, Sweden’s prime minister and al-Qaida terrorists.

    ”The Muhammad cartoon project must be made into an art work,” said Vilks, breaking away for an interview during a business seminar in Klippan, a small town in southern Sweden. ”A musical comes to mind … I think it would help the debate.”

    The eccentric sculptor said previously that the cartoons weren’t meant to insult Islam but rather to test the boundaries of artistic freedom.

    He purports to be unfazed by death threats over his caricatures, which rekindled the Muslim anger but not the violence that swept the world last year in fiery protests over a Danish newspaper’s publication of cartoons of Muhammad.

    ”Personally I’m not afraid,” Vilks said, although he admitted he starts his day by looking for bombs underneath his car. On the advice of Sweden’s security police, he now lives in a secret location under police protection.

    ”I think they are trying to frighten people. That’s their aim,” he said of the $100,000 bounty placed on his head by al-Qaida in Iraq. ”Al-Qaida is far away, but it could be some sort of challenge for the extremists we have here.”

    Vilks said his drawings were meant to provoke, but only the Swedish art community, which refused to display the cartoons for security reasons. But the project took on a larger dimension Aug. 19 when a Swedish newspaper printed one of the cartoons, showing Muhammad’s head on a dog’s body in an editorial defending freedom of expression.

    Dogs are considered unclean by conservative Muslims, and Islamic law is interpreted to forbid any depiction of the prophet, even favorable, for fear it could lead to idolatry.

    Swedish Muslim groups and governments of Islamic countries such as Iran and Pakistan condemned the drawings. Vilks said he received death threats through e-mail and phone calls, but added that most of the criticism of his works had been sensible.

    ”Most Muslims are, of course, just like other people,” Vilks said. ”They are friendly and nice. Even if they are insulted, they still behave civilized. I’m really the Muslims’ friend although they don’t like me, and I understand why.”

    Vilks said Muslims living in the West will have to get used to disrespectful drawings of their religious symbols, ”because here in the West we mock everything.”

    ”I think also the Muslims will understand that this is the system we have and it’s not really against Muslims, it’s just the principle of being able to insult religions,” he added.

    Vilks is no stranger to controversy. In the 1980s he built a sculpture of driftwood in the Kullaberg nature reserve in southern Sweden without permission, triggering a lengthy legal battle with local authorities.

    He was fined but the seaside sculpture still stands, a chaotic jumble of nailed wood called Nimis, or Latin for ”too much.” It draws some 30,000 visitors a year, the local tourism board says.”

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    Associated Press Online

    2007, 1 november kl 11:30

  7. Gates of Vienna September 29, 2007 Saturday 1:12 PM EST:

    ”Theology, Repression, and Political Dictatorship: Part 1

    Baron Bodissey

    Sep. 29, 2007 — The Modoggies are back in the news. Our Swedish correspondent Carpenter sends us this brief
    Blekinge Láns Tidning, local daily of Blekinge, Sweden, reports today on an upcoming Muslim protest in Karlskrona. It will take place on Monday, and will be attended by some 300
    Once again, the reasons for this are the roundabout dogs of blasphemy. Only this time they will not protest against one particular publication. The organizer Junaid Naseem is interviewed in the article, and tells
    ”We’ve followed the occurrences of the publications carefully, and it has been a topic of discussion among us Muslims in Blekinge. But it never seems to end and that’s what we are
    [...]>
    ”I don’t understand why we should be insulted, again and again. To us, a dog isn’t always a cute
    The protest is not aimed at the media in Blekinge,
    ”It is a protest against the publications as a phenomenon. We want them to
    On a free
    ”[Freedom of the press] is good. But at the same time the media have a responsibility not to insult. For instance, you never write about suicides, out of consideration for the Lars Vilks has even made it into the political heart of the mainstream American media. We’ve been known to mock The Washington Post from time to time in this space. It is, after all, the in-house trade journal for the Democrat Party. It carries water for the Washington liberal establishment, and can be counted upon to toe the party line on everything from homosexual rights to the dangers of trans-fats.
    >But it doesn’t always get everything wrong, and it’s willing to publish occasional editorials that stray from orthodoxy.
    >Take, for example, this morning’s piece by Paul Marshall, ”Muzzling in the Name of Islam”. Mr. Marshall uses Lars Vilks and his drawings as the jumping-off point for an analysis of political repression in Islamic
    Some of the world’s most repressive governments are attempting to use a controversy over a Swedish cartoon to provide legitimacy for their suppression of their critics in the name of respect for Islam. In particular, the Organization of the Islamic Conference is seeking to rewrite international human rights standards to curtail any freedom of expression that threatens their more authoritarian
    In August, Swedish artist Lars Vilks drew a cartoon with Mohammed’s head on a dog’s body. He is now in hiding after Al Qaeda in Iraq placed a bounty of $100,000 on his head (with a $50,000 bonus if his throat is slit) and police told him he was no longer safe at A minor factual Mr. Vilks actually drew his Modoggies sometime in July — or earlier — since the exhibition which rejected them opened on July 20th. Mr. Vilks continued to draw Mohammed in various canine guises throughout August and September, and presumably will continue in October and November and onwards, until the fatwa is carried out and he is slaughtered like a lamb.
    >But we’ll let that go, because otherwise Mr. Marshall’s summary of the crisis is accurate and complete. I’ll skip the rest of it, because it’s very familiar to regular readers of this
    He goes on to make this important – - – - – - – - These calls [for limitations on freedom of the press] were renewed in September when a U.N. report said that Articles 18, 19 and 20 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights should be reinterpreted by ”adopting complementary standards on the interrelations between freedom of expression, freedom of religion and non-discrimination.” Speaking for the OIC, Pakistani diplomat Marghoob Saleem Butt then criticized ”unrestricted and disrespectful enjoyment of freedom of expression.”
    >The issues here go beyond the right of cartoonists to offend people. They go to the heart of repression in much of the Muslim world. Islamists and authoritarian governments now routinely use accusations of blasphemy to repress writers, journalists, political dissidents and, perhaps politically most important, religious reformers.
    Mr. Marshall follows this with extensive examples of journalists and dissidents in various Islamic countries who have been arrested, imprisoned, and tortured for blasphemy or ”insulting Islam”. He concludes with
    Repressive laws, supplemented and reinforced by terrorists, vigilantes and mob violence, are a fundamental barrier to open discussion and dissent, and so to democracy and free societies, within the Muslim world. When politics and religion are intertwined, there can be no political freedom without religious freedom, including the right to criticize religious ideas. Hence, removing legal bans on blasphemy and ‘insulting Islam’ is vital to protecting an open debate that could lead to other
    If, in the name of false toleration and religious sensitivity, free nations do not firmly condemn and resist these totalitarian strictures, we will abet the isolation of reformist Muslims, and condemn them to silence behind what Sen. Joseph Lieberman has aptly termed a ”theological iron The theological iron curtain is draped over every country with a majority Muslim population. Wherever the Muslim faith predominates, political repression and despotism are the rule. Afghanistan and Iraq are no any pluralism which is now tolerated in these two countries would recede quickly if the encouraging presence of the United States military were withdrawn.
    >Turkey is often
    cited as an exception — the exception — to Islamic despotism. But secularism in Turkey is enforced from the top down. It has shallow roots, and requires repeated interventions by the military in order to survive. Indonesia and Malaysia also used to be relatively tolerant places, but as European colonialism recedes further into history, these countries have become more and more Islamized and
    Looking at fourteen centuries of Islamic history makes one wonder whether non-repressive government within a majority Muslim country is even possible. In the tenth century the differences between Islamic polities and European ones were not so stark, but Muslim countries have, by and large, remained in the tenth century, while the rest of us have moved
    The big question when Islam becomes the majority religion, does political repression inevitably
    Is Islamic despotism an accident of history? Or does the despotism always follow the religion, as thunder invariably follows
    >For previous posts on Lars Vilks and the Roundabout Dogs, see the Modoggie Archives.>”

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    Theology, Repression, and Political Dictatorship: Part 1

    2007, 1 november kl 11:32

  8. PrairiePundit: September 29, 2007 Saturday 10:41 AM EST

    ”Suppression in the name of Islam

    Merv

    Sep. 29, 2007 — Paul Marshall:>
    Some of the world’s most repressive governments are attempting to use a controversy over a Swedish cartoon to provide legitimacy for their suppression of their critics in the name of respect for Islam. In particular, the Organization of the Islamic Conference is seeking to rewrite international human rights standards to curtail any freedom of expression that threatens their more authoritarian members. In August, Swedish artist Lars Vilks drew a cartoon with Mohammed’s head on a dog’s body. He is now in hiding after Al Qaeda in Iraq placed a bounty of $100,000 on his head (with a $50,000 bonus if his throat is slit) and police told him he was no longer safe at home. As with the 2005 Danish Jyllands-Posten cartoons, and the knighting of Salman Rushdie, Muslim ambassadors and the OIC have not only demanded an apology from the Swedes, but are also pushing Western countries to restrict press freedom in the name of preventing ”insults” to The Iranian foreign ministry protested to Sweden, while Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad asserted that ”Zionists,” ”an organized minority who have i nfiltrated the world,” were behind the affair. Pakistan complained and said that ”the right to freedom of expression” is inconsistent with ”defamation of religions and prophets.” The Turkish Ministry of Religious Affairs called for rules specifying new limits of press freedom. These calls were renewed in September when a U.N. report said that Articles 18, 19 and 20 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights should be reinterpreted by ”adopting complementary standards on the interrelations between freedom of expression, freedom of religion and non-discrimination.” Speaking for the OIC, Pakistani diplomat Marghoob Saleem Butt then criticized ”unrestricted and disrespectful enjoyment of freedom of expression.” The issues here go beyond the right of cartoonists to offend people. They go to the heart of repression in much of the Muslim world. Islamists and authoritarian governments now routinely use accusations of blasphemy to repress writers, journalists, political dissidents and, perhaps politically most important, religious On Sept. 22, three political dissidents in Iran, Ehsan Mansouri, Majid Tavakoli and Ahmad Ghassaban, were put on trial for writing articles against ”Islamic holy values.” Iran’s most prominent dissident, Akbar Ganji, was himself imprisoned on charges including ”spreading propaganda against the Islamic system.” In August, Taslima Nasreen, who had to flee Bangladesh for her life because her feminist writings were accused of being ”against Islam,” was investigated in India for hurting Muslims’ ”religious sentiments.” Egypt has been unusually active of late in imprisoning its critics in the name of
    …>This suppression would lead one to believe that Islam is a very fragile religion that cannot withstand criticism or ridicule. That could be, but the real onus of these attacks is submission. These people want to world to submit to their weird religious beliefs and if you don’t submit they think murder is the answer. That is a wicked frame of mind, but it is the one these enemies of freedom have in pursuit of their religious bigotry.”

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    PrairiePundit

    2007, 1 november kl 11:33

  9. Washingtonpost.com September 29, 2007 Saturday 12:00 AM EST:

    ”Muzzling in the Name of Islam

    Paul Marshall, Special to washingtonpost.com’s Think Tank Town, washingtonpost.com

    Some of the world’s most repressive governments are attempting to use a controversy over a Swedish cartoon to provide legitimacy for their suppression of their critics in the name of respect for Islam. In particular, the Organization of the Islamic Conference is seeking to rewrite international human rights standards to curtail any freedom of expression that threatens their more authoritarian members.

    Some of the world’s most repressive governments are attempting to use a controversy over a Swedish cartoon to provide legitimacy for their suppression of their critics in the name of respect for Islam. In particular, the Organization of the Islamic Conference is seeking to rewrite international human rights standards to curtail any freedom of expression that threatens their more authoritarian members.

    In August, Swedish artist Lars Vilks drew a cartoon with Mohammed’s head on a dog’s body. He is now in hiding after Al Qaeda in Iraq placed a bounty of $100,000 on his head (with a $50,000 bonus if his throat is slit) and police told him he was no longer safe at home. As with the 2005 Danish Jyllands-Posten cartoons, and the knighting of Salman Rushdie, Muslim ambassadors and the OIC have not only demanded an apology from the Swedes, but are also pushing Western countries to restrict press freedom in the name of preventing ”insults” to Islam.

    The Iranian foreign ministry protested to Sweden, while Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad asserted that ”Zionists,” ”an organized minority who have infiltrated the world,” were behind the affair. Pakistan complained and said that ”the right to freedom of expression” is inconsistent with ”defamation of religions and prophets.” The Turkish Ministry of Religious Affairs called for rules specifying new limits of press freedom.

    These calls were renewed in September when a U.N. report said that Articles 18, 19 and 20 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights should be reinterpreted by ”adopting complementary standards on the interrelations between freedom of expression, freedom of religion and non-discrimination.” Speaking for the OIC, Pakistani diplomat Marghoob Saleem Butt then criticized ”unrestricted and disrespectful enjoyment of freedom of expression.”

    The issues here go beyond the right of cartoonists to offend people. They go to the heart of repression in much of the Muslim world. Islamists and authoritarian governments now routinely use accusations of blasphemy to repress writers, journalists, political dissidents and, perhaps politically most important, religious reformers.

    On Sept. 22, three political dissidents in Iran, Ehsan Mansouri, Majid Tavakoli and Ahmad Ghassaban, were put on trial for writing articles against ”Islamic holy values.” Iran’s most prominent dissident, Akbar Ganji, was himself imprisoned on charges including ”spreading propaganda against the Islamic system.” In August, Taslima Nasreen, who had to flee Bangladesh for her life because her feminist writings were accused of being ”against Islam,” was investigated in India for hurting Muslims’ ”religious sentiments.”

    Egypt has been unusually active of late in imprisoning its critics in the name of Islam. On Aug. 8, it arrested Adel Fawzy Faltas and Peter Ezzat, who work for the Canada-based Middle East Christian Association, on the grounds that, in seeking to defend human rights, they had ”insulted Islam.” Egyptian State Security has also intensified its interrogation of Quranist Muslims, whose view of Islam stresses political freedom. One of them, Amr Tharwat, had coordinated the monitoring of Egypt’s June Shura Council elections on behalf of the pro-democracy Ibn Khaldun Center, headed by prominent Egyptian democracy activist Saad Eddin Ibrahim. Prominent Egyptian ‘blogger’ Abdel Kareem Soliman was sentenced earlier this year to three years for ”insulting Islam.”

    Saudi Arabian democracy activists Ali al-Demaini, Abdullah al-Hamed, and Matruk al-Faleh were originally imprisoned on charges of using ”unIslamic terminology,” such as ‘democracy’ and ‘human rights,’ when they called for a written constitution. Saudi teacher Mohammad al-Harbi was sentenced to 40 months in jail and 750 lashes for ”mocking religion” after discussing the Bible in class and saying that the Jews were right. He was released only after an international outcry led King Abdullah to pardon him. The Indonesian Ulema Council, considered the country’s highest Islamic authority, issued a fatwa banning the Liberal Islamic Network, which teaches an open interpretation of the Koran. Then the radical Islam Defenders Front has threatened Ulil Abshar Abdulla, the network’s founder.

    Of course, these are not the only threats in repressive states’ arsenals. In Egypt activists and critics have been imprisoned for forgery and damaging Egypt’s image abroad. Saudi Arabia and Iran use a host of restrictive measures. But blasphemy charges are a potent weapon and are used systematically to silence and destroy religious minorities, authors and journalists and democracy activists. As the late Naguib Mahfouz, the only Arab winner of the Nobel Prize in literature, and whose novel Children of Gebelawi was banned in Egypt for blasphemy, put it: ”no blasphemy harms Islam and Muslims so much as the call for murdering a writer.”

    Repressive laws, supplemented and reinforced by terrorists, vigilantes and mob violence, are a fundamental barrier to open discussion and dissent, and so to democracy and free societies, within the Muslim world. When politics and religion are intertwined, there can be no political freedom without religious freedom, including the right to criticize religious ideas. Hence, removing legal bans on blasphemy and ‘insulting Islam’ is vital to protecting an open debate that could lead to other reforms.

    If, in the name of false toleration and religious sensitivity, free nations do not firmly condemn and resist these totalitarian strictures, we will abet the isolation of reformist Muslims, and condemn them to silence behind what Sen. Joseph Lieberman has aptly termed a ”theological iron curtain.”

    Paul Marshall, a senior fellow at the Hudson Institute’s Center for Religious Freedom, is writing a book on blasphemy.”

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    Washingtonpost.com

    2007, 1 november kl 11:35

  10. Financial Times (London,England) December 8, 1997, Monday:

    ”Unsettling image of a nation’s soul:

    Frederick Studemann reviews ‘Deutschlandbilder’ in Berlin:

    Just as the correct frame can often be crucial for the proper display of a picture, so the location of an exhibition can be important to the way in which works of art are received by the public.

    Such is the case with the exhibition Deutschlandbilder, or ”pictures of Germany”, which is being held in the Martin-Gropius-Bau, one of those fancily decorated, yet bulky, buildings which sprung up in Berlin at the end of the last century. Eight years ago, the building lay just on the western side of the Berlin Wall. Today it sits in the centre of a reunited city. All very appropriate for an exhibition carrying the subtitle, ”art from a divided country”.

    Eckhart Gillen, one of the exhibition’s curators, says the idea for the exhibition, which is the centrepiece of this year’s Berliner Festspiele, dates back to the 1980s when he made several visits to artists in East Germany. ”They said they weren’t East German artists, but artists living in Germany.” From there began a search for the ”common thread” in visions of Germany held by those living either side of a dividing line, or from exile.

    The result is a collection which, perhaps predictably, offers few celebratory images of Germany. The exhibition opens with the dark horrors of the 1930s and 1940s, as shown in pictures by, among others, Max Beckmann, Horst Strempel and Max Ernst. The decision to include works from this period before the formal division of Germany was taken because of the break caused by Hitler’s ascent to power which prompted many artists into exile.

    When the east-west division did set in after 1945, artists appeared not to notice as both ”sides” voiced scepticism about the societies emerging around them. In some cases, such as with Konrad Klapheck’s 1958 work Der Wille Zur Macht (”The Will For Power”), west could be east and vice versa. In an almost clinical painting of an outsized typewriter whose keys appear like columns of soldiers, Klapheck, a westerner, draws parallels between worlds of bureaucracy and the military.

    Dealing with the past is one of the central themes in the exhibition. Easterner Werner Tubke’s bitter-sweet paintings are full of almost joyous colour, yet deal in a simplistic way with the guilt of German officialdom. With his blurred pictures of typical family photographs from the Third Reich period, Gerhard Richter, a westerner, delves behind the net-curtain normality of western Germany to unearth skeletons.

    Western artists predominate, and here visitors can expect to find many of the familiar names. Joseph Beuys is there with Wirtschaftswerte (”Economic values”), basic foodstuffs displayed across iron shelves intended to highlight the link between economics and culture. Anselm Kiefer’s Deutsches Geisteshelden (”Germany’s spiritual heroes”) is an acerbic use of mythological symbols to drive home a deeply unsettling image of a nation’s soul.

    In a cross-border collaborative piece, Immendorff Visits Y the western artist Jorg Immendorff and the easterner A.R. Penck play with the differences created by subtle shifts in perspectives displayed through a series of photographs, sketches and paintings. Supposedly a chronology of Immendorff’s visit to Penck, the work is a piece of sardonic fun-poking at officially ordained promotion of opposites.

    Words painted over drawings are slightly adapted and juxtaposed to create puns or give different meanings, all ultimately linked to the jargon of division. Licht Feld (”light field”) becomes Licht Fehlt (”light missing”); Tausch (”change”) is tweaked next to form Austausch (”exchange”) – words which had a deeper significance in a world where dissidents were bought out of jail by the west and spies swapped. The final piece of the work ends with the confidently assertive, yet ultimately wholly ambiguous statement: ”Our Way Is The Right Way.”

    Penck’s sense of mischief can also been seen in his absurd Standard Models. Made out of packing materials, some originally used for sending goods across the west-east divide, Penck sends up the obsession of East German officialdom with the establishment of ”standards” and templates.

    Provocative gestures could also be found in the west as shown in Hans Haacke’s work Manet-PROJEKT 74. Ostensibly a sober documentation of the ownership of Manet’s picture, Bundle of Asparagus, the work is a highly critical look at the fate of Germany’s Jewish community and the commercial dimension of art.

    Made up of a series of simple information plates, the work details the passage of Manet’s picture from the hands of French and German financiers through leading Berlin industrialists (Paul Cassirer) and artists (Max Liebermann) into the possession of the Wallraf-Richartz-Museum in Cologne. The museum bought the picture from Liebermann’s heirs in the US with the help of donations from German industry organised by Hermann Josef Abs, the late chairman of Deutsche Bank. The final plate, which lists the donors, reads like a roll-call of post-war German industry.

    To anyone with even a passing knowledge of the debate about the role of German industry and finance in the Third Reich, the implications are clear. And it was this aspect which lead to Haacke’s work being excluded from an exhibition at the Wallraf-Richartz-Museum. Tempers have obviously cooled since then as in Berlin his work is shown for the first time together with Manet’s painting, on loan from Cologne.

    Another of Haacke’s works, Concrete, forms the literal centrepiece of the exhibition itself. Made up of concrete slabs laid out like those on a motorway, the work covers the whole of the building’s central atrium. An ironic reference to the desires of city planners in the 1970s to demolish the building to make way for an urban highway as well as a symbol of a slate wiped clean, the piece also has more immediate subversive qualities. Seen within the context of the pictures in the rooms running round the atrium, the concrete slabs might also be viewed as the empty greyness which lies at the centre of so much navel-gazing. At the Martin-Gropius-Bau, Stresemannstrasse 110, Berlin until January 11, 1998.”

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    Financial Times

    2007, 1 november kl 11:50

  11. Financial Times (London,England) March 6, 1995, Monday:

    ”Benefactor or megalomaniac? – Peter Ludwig, collector and chocolate baron, has been accused of cultural imperialism

    By ANDREW CLARK

    Within the next three weeks, the German city of Cologne will decide whether to spend up to DM200m (Pounds 85m) on re-organising its extensive art collection. The plans are controversial – not just because they involve huge public expense, but because they give the impression that one private art collector, Peter Ludwig, is dictating Cologne’s museum policy.

    Some of the proposals stem from the need to find a new home for the overcrowded ethnology museum, currently situated close to the floodwater level of the Rhine. But the biggest change has been necessitated by Ludwig’s gift of 90 Picasso paintings, to which he has attached various conditions.

    Ludwig says the Picassos and associated loans must occupy the Wallraf-Richartz Museum, an ultra-modern gallery next to Cologne’s medieval cathedral. This means removing a priceless collection of works ranging from the Renaissance to the Impressionists, and building a new museum to house them. If construction is not under way by the end of 1997, Ludwig is entitled to retract his gift. The cost of the new museum is estimated at DM90m.

    Cologne’s political leaders, anxious to maintain the city’s high profile in the art world, say the chance to acquire the Picassos – including a ‘Harlequin’ (1923) and ‘Woman with Artichoke’ (1941) – is too good to miss. The paintings aroused great public interest when they were first exhibited in Cologne in 1993, but Ludwig indicated he was also negotiating with Barcelona and other cities. Faced with the choice of accepting Ludwig’s terms or seeing the collection go elsewhere, Cologne found itself unable to refuse. Critics say the influence Ludwig has extracted from this and previous deals far exceeds the market value of his gifts. They accuse him of megalomania and cultural imperialism.

    The case highlights Ludwig’s double-edged reputation as an art collector and patron. He has amassed one of the biggest private collections in the world – estimated at 20,000 works, ranging from Greek antiquities and pre-Columbian gold objects to Picassos and Pop art. Most of the collection hangs in public museums around Europe, on permanent loan or as donations. But unlike great patrons of old, who left money to house and preserve their collections, Ludwig hands over the art only if public authorities pick up the bill for museum construction, operating costs, cataloguing, conservation and insurance.

    He demands a seat on the board of the recipient museum to assure himself a hand in policy. He likes having museums renamed after him: there are now eight – in Basle, Vienna, Budapest, Cologne, Oberhausen, Koblenz and two in Aachen. ‘He’s not a patron in the old sense of the word, although this is the image he likes to project,’ says Hans Haacke, a New York-based German artist and long-time scourge of Ludwig. ‘He looks at the tax advantages, the prestige and political ramifications of every move. He is an extremely vain person who wants permanent monuments erected in his honour, without having to pay for them himself.’

    An alert six-foot-two hulk of a man, Ludwig will be 70 in July. For someone who has roamed the earth in search of art, he presents a curiously un-cosmopolitan figure – a bit like a small-town rotarian in a conservative business suit. He was born to bourgeois comfort in Koblenz, and after war service in the German army, he studied art history, writing his doctoral thesis on Picasso – a bold subject for the conservative University of Mainz in the late 1940s.

    A fellow student was Irene Monheim, heiress to the Monheim chocolate fortune. After their marriage in 1951, Ludwig joined the Monheim family business in Aachen. He ended up as chief executive and chairman of the board, eventually changing the company’s name to Ludwig Schokolade (annual turnover DM580m, worth 20 per cent of the German market). Although he no longer exercises day-to-day control, he still spends a few hours each morning at company headquarters. Peter and Irene Ludwig have no children. Their wealth is tied up in trusts, designed to perpetuate their influence in the art world beyond their deaths.

    The Ludwigs started collecting while still at university. When the collection outgrew their space at home, they began to offer works to museums – which eased their tax burden and eliminated the cost of insurance and maintenance. Gradually they developed the idea of filling gaps in public collections which, for budgetary or political reasons, museum directors were unable to fill. Aachen’s Suermondt (now the Suermondt-Ludwig Museum), Cologne’s Schnutgen and Basle’s Museum of Antiquities (now renamed Museum of Antiquities and Ludwig Collection) all benefitted from handsome gifts of medieval and Roman treasures.

    But Ludwig is best known for the zeal with which he has bought 20th century works, including 800 Russian avant-garde paintings, 170 Picassos mainly from the artist’s later years, and the world’s biggest single collection of Pop art. Most of these are housed at Cologne’s Ludwig Museum.

    Ludwig was the first German collector to spot the potential of Pop art. ‘We see in art an expression of the times,’ he says – and in Pop art’s neon-lit mirror he beheld his own world, the consumer society of postwar West Germany. In the mid-1960s he bulk-purchased from budding New York talents such as Rauschenberg, Warhol, Lichtenstein and Oldenburg, because he knew that ‘as soon as the Americans realised the true value, prices would rocket’. They did – but not before Ludwig had walked away from Lichtenstein’s studio with six paintings for which he paid from Dollars 5,000 to Dollars 10,000 each. They are now worth millions. To mount a representative exhibition of Pop art today, museums have to borrow from Ludwig’s collection.

    Art experts say Ludwig has exposed the European public to movements which public curators would not have dared to touch. ‘When Ludwig’s collection of Pop art first went on show, it caused a sensation’, says the American critic David Galloway, a professor at the University of the Ruhr in north Germany.

    ‘Europeans were suddenly confronted with the latest developments in art on the other side of the Atlantic. Ludwig has also championed South American and Cuban art. He is the only collector who has consistently tried to redefine and expand the horizons of the art world, which is locked into a mid-Atlantic syndrome, exchanging the same things back and forth between Europe and North America.’

    Ludwig’s interest in art has not been entirely altruistic. Critics say he used his reputation as a collector to open doors for his chocolate business in east Europe before the fall of communism. ‘He was taken round the exhibitions of officially-approved art in Dresden and Moscow, was allowed to buy wholesale and brought it all back to Aachen, where he effectively runs the municipal museum,’ says Haacke. ‘Here was the big western collector, giving his seal of approval to paintings that no-one in the west wanted to see, and ignoring the underground artists who desperately needed support. This was not, as he claimed, a way of bridging the east-west divide through art. He was keen to establish links with the authorities.’

    Ludwig is no stranger to controversy. In the 1970s, he tried to create a state-funded national foundation for art – an idea which was torpedoed as soon as he proposed himself as chairman with wide-ranging powers. In 1983, he sold 144 medieval manuscripts to the Getty Museum for DM100m – although the city of Cologne had financed the curating and cataloguing on the understanding they would be lodged in the city. Ludwig has also collected the work of artists favoured by the Nazis. He is now investigating the art of communist China.

    Many commentators say Ludwig’s reputation would be higher if he adopted a lower profile. ‘You get the impression he collects for the sake of collecting and for the influence it brings, rather than as a real lover of art,’ says Christian Herchenroder, cultural editor of the German newspaper Handelsblatt. ‘With his chocolate business, he could never be more than a provincial tycoon. But as an art collector, his fame is spread over the world.’”

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    Financial Times

    2007, 1 november kl 11:51

  12. The Independent (London) May 18, 1992, Monday:

    ”Contemporary Art Market: Censorship unites dissident artists

    By GERALDINE NORMAN

    THE DISTINCT kinds of art that attract censorship under communism and capitalism were highlighted by adjacent exhibitions in New York’s SoHo district last week. Eric Bulatov and Oleg Vassiliev, two of the most famous Russian dissident artists, were showing at the Phyllis Kind Gallery (136 Greene Street), while Hans Haacke, who has had shows cancelled by the Guggenheim Museum in New York and the Walraf-Richartz Museum in Cologne, had a show at the John Weber Gallery (142 Greene Street).

    The three are of similar age; Vassiliev was born in Moscow in 1931, Bulatov in the Urals in 1933 and Haacke in Cologne in 1936 – he moved to America in 1965. The Russians work conventionally in oil on canvas, and also make drawings and prints. Haacke is an installation artist and his work is more expensive than the Russians’; these days, censorship counts as an additional honour for the artist.

    How did Haacke manage to upset free-thinking Western museum curators? By making highly personalised critiques of the patrons their museums depend on. An installation which explored the previous ownership of a Manet painting of asparagus included a panel revealing that Hermann J. Abs, chairman of the Wallraf-Richartz Museum trustees, had been Hitler’s economics minister. Another recorded Saatchi and Saatchi’s business activities in South Africa; a third explored the links between Peter Luwig’s art aquisitions and his chocolate business.

    The works on show at the Weber Gallery are an attack on President Bush, with special reference to Operation Desert Storm. A supermarket trolley packed with teddy bears wearing army uniforms is priced at $ 25,000 ( pounds 14,200); a broken-down sofa with a cushion on it embroidered with a Bush quote that equated opposition to cuts in capital gains tax with puritanism costs $ 55,000. The centrepiece, a scruffy, disused locker-room dominated by a portrait of Bush in an elaborate gilt-wood frame, costs $ 75,000.

    The Russians prefer to make old-fashioned visual poetry out of their analysis of the destructive forces in society. Both combine hyper-realism with text in ornamental compositions; Vassiliev likes to superimpose unrelated images and patterns.

    The works on show were all painted since the artists left Russia in the late 1980s; they had worked closely together for 30 years, sharing studio spaces and collaborating.

    Bulatov’s paintings are mainly about the US, which he views with a critical but friendly eye. The American Dream shows a glamorous pin-up in a red bathing dress hung over a vagrant asleep in the street, surrounded by litter. The final oil painting costs $ 50,000; several highly-finished preparatory drawings are a good buy at $ 7,000 each.

    Vassiliev portrays his memories of Russia. A moonlit woodland which appears to be breaking away from Earth and floating into destruction is shown in two polychrome studies ($ 7,000 and $ 10,000) and a final monochrome graphite on canvas ($ 20,000). A Boulevard in Sokolniky is a black and white, photographically painted, of a rain-drenched street with brown autumn leaves drifting across it ($ 20,000).”

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    The Independent

    2007, 1 november kl 11:53

  13. En uppmaning till er som matar in all denna tveklöst intressanta men väldigt långrandiga information från engelskspråkiga media:

    Skriv om möjligt en kort sammanfattning på svenska som inledning!

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    Fredrikzon

    2007, 1 november kl 13:25

  14. Härmed förevigar jag mig själv i ditt konstverk.

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    Per Holmdén

    2007, 1 november kl 14:16

  15. 40 000 år i fängelse!

    De barbariska Muhammedanisterna dödade 191 människor och skadade nästan 2000 andra, när de sprängde 10 bomber på olika järnvägsstationer i Madrid den 11 mars 2004!

    Nu har domen fallit mot 21 av dem som begick dessa makabra terrordåd. Förutom för själva bombdåden; mord på 191 människor och mordförsök på ytterligare 1 956 personer, dömdes samtliga för att ha varit medlemmar av en muhammedanistisk terroristorganisation!

    De fick vardera 40 000 år i fängelse!

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    Håll Muhammed kopplad!

    2007, 1 november kl 14:26

  16. Fredrikzon,
    Verkligen inte nödvändigt med någon svensk sammanfattning för det här ett kvalificerat forum. Franska och tyska går bra också .Intressant på tyska här
    http://www.taz.de/index.php?id=archivseite&dig=2006/02/06/a0132
    För dem som har svårighet med tyskan finns en engelsk översättning.
    http://www.signandsight.com/features/597.html

    Artikelförfattaren Sonia Mikich är programledare och chef för Monitor på tyska ”public service”-kanalen WDR.
    http://www.wdr.de/tv/monitor/redaktion.phtml
    En programledare på svensk pk-tv hade troligen inte fått behålla jobbet efter att ha skrivit en så islamkritisk artikel. Men Mikich är fortvarig chef för Monitor. Tyskland ligger före oss, liksom Danmark.

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    mellis

    2007, 1 november kl 14:44

  17. Förresten, anledningen till att jag själv blev mordhotad av muslimer var att jag stillsamt hänvisade till den här artikeln i Wikipedia
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jyllands-Posten_Muhammad_cartoons_controversy där Jyllandspostens karikatyrer fanns. Gjorde några inlägg på en blogg tillhörig en engelsman bosatt i Frankrike. Han hade lagt ut karikatyrerna som protest mot att europeiska tidningar med få undantag inte vågade visa dem. Men muslimernas mordhot gjorde att bloggaren senare tog bort karikatyrerna. Då påpekade jag att de fanns på Wikipedia. Dessutom hade Wikipedia spärrat aktuell sida så att muslimerna inte kunde ta bort dem. Mer behövdes inte för att de skulle bli alldeles vansinninga.

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    mellis

    2007, 1 november kl 15:40

  18. mellis

    Fredrikzon har rätt i det avseendet att den artkeln som du linkar till(http://www.signandsight.com/features/597.html) är så insiktsfull att det i sig själv vore ett fullgott argument för att översätta till svenska, så att alla i detta landet, oavsett språkkunskaper, kan lära sig av den!

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    Christer Eriksson

    2007, 1 november kl 15:42

  19. Här är en intressant men kort sammanfattning av rondellhundsprojektet. Eftersom det här är ett kvalificerat forum bryr jag mig inte om att översätta till svenska:

    ????????????????????????? CEO MBA
    ????????????????? ATM ???????????????????
    ??????????
    ?????????????????????????????
    ?????????????????????? CEO MBA ???????? 4 – 6 ?.?. 50
    ??????????
    ??????
    ???????????????????? CEO MBA ???? 07 ??????????

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    Fredrikzon

    2007, 1 november kl 15:42

  20. Fredrikzon tycker jag har rätt i att några rader, eller en liten ingress, skulle öka överblicken, tillgängligheten och intresset. Själv kan jag uppleva att en lång text inte alltid får en chans av mig eftersom den inte respekterar min tid.

    En lång text fungerar bäst om man söker upp den själv, exempelvis genom nyfikenhet efter att ha läst en liten ingress.

    Omfattning är i sig heller ingen garanti för kvalitet. Det mesta går att koka ner till en mer kraftfull, tillgänglig och uppenbar essens.

    Om sedan texten skrivs på engelska eller svenska är en mindre fråga för mig. Jag uppskattar för övrigt Fredrikzons kärnfulla sammanfattning av rondellhundsprojektet på koreanska.

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    Joanna

    2007, 1 november kl 17:03

  21. Fredrikzon,
    Intressant och skrivet på ett muslimspråk? Låter som en motsägelse. ;)

    Fast muslimer kan i och för sig skriva kreativa hot. Här två som riktades mot mig.

    ”if u are a sensible person then u should go in hiding because a suspect that there will be a lot of people aftert u and well everyone wants your head on a platter so do i”

    ”am going to shag your mother your sister adn all of your family ehn am going to shove a rocklet launher up your ass and pull teh trigger and ur ass will be going to hell!!”

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    mellis

    2007, 1 november kl 17:24

  22. Jag trodde detta var ett kvalificerat forum, mellis. Det finns väl inget sådant som ett ”muslimspråk”?

    Språket jag skrev på var thai. Däremot var det förmodligen inte speciellt intressant utan handlar antagligen om öppettiderna för någon liten bilverkstad någonstans i världen.

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    Fredrikzon

    2007, 1 november kl 18:06

  23. Humanitet, förnuft och bildning

    En essä om humanismen, dess historiska gestaltningar och framtida möjligheter

    Jimmy Sand, den 28 september 2004

    Humani nihil a me alienum puto.

    ”Intet mänskligt är mig främmande.”

    – Terentius (ca 195-159 f.Kr.)

    Homo res sacra homini.

    ”Människan är för människan någonting heligt.”

    – Seneca (ca 4 f.Kr.-65 e.Kr.)

    Hela den hittillsvarande historien har varit en historia om kampen för tolkningsföreträde. Att kunna tolka tillvaron på ett övertygande sätt är i någon mening detsamma som att behärska den. Därför är språket – den mänskliga tillvarons pragmatik och semantik – ett kraftfullt medel till makt. Den som kan sätta betydelse till de värdeladdade orden kan också avgöra vilka sanningar som är oantastliga och vilka lögner som är försumbara.

    Ett sådant värdeladdat ord är humanism, eller har i varje fall varit det. Innan vi frågar oss om det gått inflation i detta begrepp – om det över huvud taget är någonting värt att kämpa för längre – bör vi ställa frågan om vilka betydelser det givits av dem som haft tolkningsföreträde. Är humanism, liksom de närbesläktade idéerna om demokrati och mänskliga rättigheter, någonting specifikt västerländskt som man måste bomba fram i vissa länder? Är humanist något man kan kalla sig för att slippa ta ställning för jämställdhet mellan kvinnor och män, eller reflektera över de invanda föreställningarna om vad som är kvinnligt respektive manligt? Eller är det humanism att tolerera vilka som helst förtryckande och diskriminerande sedvänjor, med den postmoderna motiveringen att vad som anses rätt och riktigt i en kultur inte behöver vara det i en annan?
    En kort idéhistorik

    I framställningar om humanismen brukar man ofta presentera en idéhistorisk bakgrund till begreppet. Det ser jag som relevant även för vår del. Under århundradet före vår tideräknings början förespråkade romaren Cicero studia humanitas, studerandet av de gamla filosoferna, historieskrivarna och poeterna – detta för att utveckla egenskapen humanitas (’humanitet’). Under den italienska renässansen (från 1300-talets slut) dök ordet umanista (’humanist’) upp, som en beteckning för dem som sökte kunskap och föredöme hos de antika författarna. Ordet humanismus (’humanism’) är en uppfinning av det tyska 1800-talet, först om renässansens återupptäckt av det sekulära, antika kulturarvet, senare också om själva studiet av detta arv. Av detta kommer begreppet humaniora. Man kan säga att det i detta historiska hänseende funnits tre slags humanism: först under den romerska antiken, Ciceros tid, därefter under renässansen, representerad av män som Petrarca, Erasmus av Rotterdam och – ofta förbisedd – Michel de Montaigne, samt slutligen under upplysningstiden, i det som idag är Tyskland, med bland andra Wilhelm von Humboldt och Johann Wolfgang von Goethe.

    Vad var då det väsentliga hos dessa tre slags humanism? För att börja med Cicero, retorikern och politikern som levde under första århundradet före vår tideräknings början, så var denne i sina filosofiska ståndpunkter en stoiker, med influenser från både Aristoteles och skepticismen. Inom etiken stod stoikerna – till skillnad från de grekiska filosoferna – för en kosmopolitisk solidaritet och humanitet. Alla människor har ett egenvärde, oavsett etnicitet, kön och klass. Dessutom införde de naturrättstanken, enligt vilken rådande lagar kan vara bristfälliga – men att det finns en naturlig rätt som människovärdet bygger på. Förenta Nationernas allmänna förklaring om de mänskliga rättigheterna anknyter till denna tradition. Märkligt nog kunde Cicero se naturrätten förverkligad i det romerska samhället (liknande Hegel i 1800-talets Preussen och Fukuyama i USA efter kalla kriget). Att det sedan fanns stora sociala klyftor var tydligen något han kunde bortse från eller bortförklara.

    Renässanshumanismen kan sägas ha uppstått som en rörelse i opposition mot medeltidens tänkande, där humanisterna såg den komplicerade skolastiska filosofin som en dimridå mellan den enskilda människan och den verkliga kunskapen. I mycket handlade det därför om litteraturstudier och språkvetenskapligt arbete, som i fallet med Martin Luthers översättning av Bibeln till folkspråket. Humanisterna eftersträvade att göra det komplicerade begripligt, så att lärdomen tillsammans med livet kan bilda en odelbar helhet, och anklagade den medeltida lärdomstraditionen för att ha tappat kontakten med den konkreta verkligheten. Den hade gjort människor omyndiga, medan humanisternas mål var att göra människan myndig. Som Georg Henrik von Wright och andra påvisat lade detta projekt grunden för den vetenskapliga revolutionen, det kapitalistiska systemet (jfr. Max Webers tes om den protestantiska etiken och kapitalismens anda) och över huvud taget det moderna samhället.

    På samma sätt som renässanshumanismen hänger samman med reformationen och den vetenskapliga revolutionen, så kan man inte förstå den s.k. nyhumanismen annat än i samband med upplysningen och franska revolutionen. Det är först under upplysningstiden – den fas i den kulturella utvecklingen som inträder i ett land, vilket som helst, när det lämnar den feodala samhällsformen – som renässansens ideal om den fria människan slår igenom. Immanuel Kant, den filosof som kanske bäst sammanfattat arvet från denna tid, beskriver upplysningen som ”människans utträde ur hennes självförvållade omyndighet” (ur Svar på frågan: Vad är upplysning? från 1784). I enlighet med Arsenij Gulygas biografi om Kant kan man hos upplysningen urskilja tre bärande element: För det första idén om formella mänskliga rättigheter, som man uppfattar som humanismens garant; för det andra spridandet av kunskaper som ett universellt botemedel mot alla sociala missförhållanden; samt för det tredje det historiska perspektiv som inte bara lägger grunden för det moderna studiet av historien, utan också har en genomgående optimistisk syn på den historiska utvecklingen. Ett karakteristiskt exempel på detta är markis Jean Antoine de Condorcets Människosläktets andliga förkovran (eller, med en direktöversättning av den franska titeln: ’Utkast till en historisk översikt över det mänskliga tänkandets framsteg’), skriven 1793, medan författaren var på flykt undan franska revolutionens skräckvälde.

    I anslutning till von Wright kan man hävda att om renässanshumanisterna kämpade för människans värdighet, hennes oberoende av etablerade auktoriteter i frågor om sanningen, så var nyhumanisternas nyckelord bildning. Två månader innan Kants publikation skrev Moses Mendelssohn: ”Ett språk uppnår upplysning genom vetenskaperna och kultur genom socialt umgänge, poesi och tal. Det förra gör oss skickligare i teoretiskt bruk, det senare i praktiskt. Tillsammans förlänar de språket bildning.” (ur Om frågan: Vad innebär upplysning?). Sedan använde den preussiske utbildningsministern Wilhelm von Humboldt detta relativt nyskapade, tyska ord – Bildung – som ledstjärna för det 1809 grundade Berlins universitet. Denne efterföljare till Kant ville med ordet återuppväcka det grekiska idealet paideia, uppfostran eller utbildning. Grekernas föreställning om ett nära samband mellan människans kunskap och den värld varom kunskapen handlar, blev hos Humboldt förbunden med den tyska idealismen, för vilken han var en viktig talesman, men också oundvikligen de moderna föreställningarna om individ, utveckling och natur. Bildning är någonting som utvecklar den människa som skaffar sig den, vidgar hennes horisonter och fördjupar hennes förståelse. Därför handlar det för Humboldt inte så mycket om innehåll, utan snarare om ett tillägnande av ett visst sätt att tänka. Om Cicero förespråkade studiet av poeter, filosofer och historieskrivare, så ser Humboldt språk, matematik och historia som de viktigaste ämnena. Språket bör helst vara modersmålet olikt, så att dess struktur framträder tydligt; matematiken är vid åtminstone mer avancerade stadier tillräckligt abstrakt för att forma förnuftet; inom studiet av historien, slutligen, gäller det att förstå de stora skeendena. Tanken är förstås att individen genom denna formella bildning ska lägga grunden för en livslång process av lärande.

    Sammanfattningsvis kan det konstateras att det vi kallar humanism, i dess olika historiska gestaltningar, centrerats kring idéer om en universell humanitet (naturrätten och de mänskliga rättigheterna), ett lika universellt, kritiskt förnuft i livets tjänst (sökandet efter kunskap oberoende av auktoriteter), samt bildningen som en process för att förverkliga dessa idéer. Andra historiska fenomen, nära besläktade med humanismen, är sekularisering, vetenskapliga framsteg och ekonomisk liberalism – men dessa är snarast sekundära, för den sakens skull inte mindre viktiga, följdföreteelser. Begreppet humanism har ofta fått stå för en ideologi om ”människan i centrum”, vilket gör att humanister under det gångna århundradet bildat front mot religiös fundamentalism och politisk totalitarism, men de har också fått ta emot kritik för att stå för en ohållbar världsbild och ofta också en dold agenda. Hur detta kunnat ta sig uttryck ska vi undersöka i det följande.
    Nittonhundratalets humanister och antihumanister

    Under 1900-talet fick humanismen genom sina företrädare en mer uttalat politisk, eller i varje fall ståndpunktsorienterad framtoning. Mitt under depressionen kom i USA Humanistiskt manifest (1933), undertecknat av bland andra den pragmatiske filosofen och pedagogen John Dewey, som förespråkade en icke-teistisk livsåskådning som alternativ till världens religioner, men också nationell ekonomisk och social planering. På den europeiska kontinenten försvarade Jean-Paul Sartre sin filosofi med skriften Existentialismen är en humanism (1946), där han hävdar människans radikala frihet och förnekar varje form av högre instans över henne. Innan dess hade Sartres landsman Albert Camus med boken Myten om Sisyfos (1942) beskrivit människans situation i en värld som i sig saknar mening, och med Människans revolt (1953) angav han kampen för mänsklig värdighet som en väg till att ge livet mening. I Sverige polemiserade den analytiske filosofen Ingemar Hedenius mot framför allt kristendomen, med skriften Tro och vetande (1949), medan den finlandssvenske filosofen Georg Henrik von Wright med böcker som Vetenskapen och förnuftet (1986) och Myten om framsteget (1993) snarare riktade udden mot övertron på naturvetenskap, ekonomi och teknologi.

    Det förra seklet skådade också fenomen som humanistisk marxism, vilken med representanter som Sartre och Maurice Merleau-Ponty utgick från de 1932 publicerade Ekonomisk-filosofiska manuskripten (som Karl Marx skrev 1844). Bland annat ville man, med stöd hos den unge Marx, ta avstånd från stalinismen och marxism-leninismen för att istället betona teorierna om alienation och om människans frigörelse från exploatering och förtryck. Ett annat fenomen var den humanistiska psykologin, som på 1960-talet framträdde med anspråk om att vara en tredje väg vid sidan av behaviorismen och Freuds psykoanalys. Som grundare brukar Abraham Maslow utpekas, men bland övriga namn i samma krets finner vi Aldous Huxley, Viktor Frankl, Arthur Koestler och Rollo May. Med influenser från bl.a. österländsk filosofi och meditativa praktiker, existentialism och fenomenologi, betonades den enskilda människans potential till självförverkligande. Personlig utveckling och frigörelse, en befrielse från falska jagbilder, betraktades som en angelägenhet för psykologisk teori och praktik.

    Samtidigt med detta genombrott på bred front, om man nu vill tolka ovan uppräknade uttryck som ett sådant, så har humanismen under 1900-talet stått inför allvarliga utmaningar och mött sina skarpaste kritiker. Människan har med de natur- och samhällsvetenskapliga framstegen, genom dess medicinska, teknologiska och administrativa tillämpningar, inte bara åstadkommit världsomspännande och snabba kommunikationsmedel, minskad barnadödlighet och sjukdomsrisk samt ökad genomsnittlig livslängd – hon har också skapat dödslägren i Auschwitz och Gulag samt bomberna över Hiroshima och Vietnam. Människan har från rymden sett den planet som är hennes hem, vilket om något bör mana till större insikt om nödvändigheten av en global solidaritet och humanitet, men hon har också vållat de globala utmaningar som den ekologiska krisen innebär.

    Inte bara har sådana som Hitler, Stalin och bin Ladin förlöjligat humanismen och dess ideal, utan den har också kritiserats av mer välmenande personer för sina brister: Den franske idéhistorikern Michel Foucault talade om ”människans död”, med vilket han menade att idén om människan som sådan är en uppfinning av 1800-talet. Inom humanvetenskaperna har man under 1900-talet fått allt större insikt om människan som en bärare av inte någonting substantiellt, utan snarare av olika struktursammanhang: språkliga, sociala, kulturella, etc. Det vi ser som den mänskliga individen är i stort formad av olika slags socialisation. Annan kritik liknande Foucaults är feministisk (Simone de Beauvoir, Judith Butler) eller s.k. postkolonial (Frantz Fanon, Edward Said). Med tiden har också en biologistisk människosyn, med betoning av genernas och evolutionens betydelse, fått ett allt större genomslag. Frågan om arv eller miljö är inte längre relevant. Den stora frågan är snarare huruvida det bortom de språkliga, sociala och biologiska kontexterna alls går att finna den individ som för humanismen är så central. Utan en kritisk omvärdering kan inte det humanistiska credo bli något annat än en läpparnas bekännelse, ett till intet förpliktigande sätt att försköna sitt moraliska kapital – hur mycket dess ideal än propageras.
    Perspektiv inför framtiden: Humanitet, förnuft och bildning

    Hur kan då en humanism för det tredje millenniet formuleras för att övervinna de brister som dess kritiker påtalat? Som Alf Ahlberg en gång påpekat, i sin utmärkta bok Humanismen: Historiska perspektiv och nutida synpunkter (1951), är humanismen i grund och botten en livsåskådning. Den kan inte – lika lite som socialism eller feminism – vara vetenskapligt motiverad. Som all livsåskådning bygger humanismen på en kärna av övertygelse, eller tro om man så vill, vad gäller ideal och mål. Sedan kan – och bör kanske också – medlen för att uppnå dessa mål vara föremål för vetenskapliga undersökningar. Enligt Ahlberg är det här som skiljelinjen mellan profan och religiös humanism går: hos den förra kan en vetenskaplig människosyn tjäna som grund för humanismen, medan den senare snarare hävdar att det hos människan finns något ”som på en gång är högre än människan men som hon likväl upplever som sitt innersta och sanna väsen”. Detta essentiella, som måste vara föremål för vördnad, är vad man kan kalla humanitet – gemensamt för alla människor i konkret mening.

    Kritikerna av humanismen, ofta kallade antihumanister, har pekat på det ohållbara och ofta farliga i att alltför skarpt åtskilja människan från resten av verkligheten. Darwins teorier har idag blivit allmänt erkända, så till den grad att sociobiologiska föreställningar – ofta konservativa när det gäller sexualitet eller etnicitet – kan samsas med uppfattningen att djur och natur helt oproblematiskt kan exploateras i den hejdlösa tillväxtekonomins namn. Mot detta kan sägas att människan i någon mening naturligtvis är ett djur som vilket annat som helst, men hon äger samtidigt förmågan att reflektera kring sina givna förutsättningar. Man kan formulera det som att förnuftet, eller kulturen om man så vill, utgör hennes evolutionära försprång. Lustupplevelser kan äga ett egenvärde, men de behöver inte vara det enda, eller ens det högsta. Att som levnadsprincip ha ohämmad behovstillfredsställelse är inte individualism, utan blott naken, narcissistisk egoism. Människan är för det första ett socialt djur, med vilket menas att hennes välbefinnande förutsätter andra människors välbefinnande. Egoismen sätter den egna personen i första rummet; individualismen är en hållning där man erkänner varje annan individs rätt till välbefinnande i lika hög grad som sin egen. För det andra är människan som alla andra djur beroende av de ekologiska sammanhangen. Som von Wright argumenterat för, så bör människans herravälde över naturen förenas med en besinningsfullhet och beredskap att respektera det jämviktstillstånd som råder i naturen.

    Humaniteten är, som vi ser, förenat med vad man kalla ett praktiskt förnuft eller gott omdöme. Hur uppnås då ett sådant? Jo, genom bildning förstås, skulle humanisten svara. Det bildningsbegrepp vi här vill propagera för kan förstås ur två perspektiv, omöjliga att helt skilja åt: dels den aristoteliska etiken, med dess betoning av odling av karaktären, dels den hermeneutiska kunskapsteorin, sådan den lagts ut av Hans-Georg Gadamer. Hermeneutiken uppstod som en vetenskapsfilosofi för humaniora (ett ord som lustigt nog betyder ungefär ’studier för att göra människan mänskligare’), men under 1900-talet har den utvecklats till en filosofi med giltighet också utanför den akademiska världen. I likhet med Humboldt betonar Gadamer språkets betydelse – det är ju främst det som skiljer människan från djuren och hjälpt henne utveckla sitt förnuft och sin kultur. Språket kännetecknas också av den dubbelhet som präglar den mänskliga tillvaron som sådan: det formas och förändras av den individ som brukar det, samtidigt som språket i gengäld också formar individen. Martin Heidegger, Gadamers mentor, var ibland mer nyanserad än Sartre i sin existentialfilosofi: Han talade om ”kastadhet”, med vilket åsyftades att människan alltid redan befinner sig i en situation som bär på mening av olika slag. Den enskilde har inte själv skapat sin värld. Men samtidigt är människan också ”kastande”, vilket också Sartre ansåg, då hon är engagerad i att skapa sin framtida värld. Överfört till hermeneutiken innebär det att vi alltid kan vidga våra vyer, det vill säga överskrida de kontexter som begränsar oss. Det är bildningens intellektuella sida: Att intressera sig för det Annorlunda, inte för att kunna känna igen sig – inte på något ytligt plan – utan snarare för att få förståelse för det mänskligas mångfald. Ökad förståelse för den Andre medför att man själv växer som människa, men det är i likhet med språket en process som aldrig kan fullbordas. Historien når aldrig sitt slut. Man måste utgå från att alltid kunna lära sig någonting nytt.

    Trots att den katolska, medeltida filosofins intresse för Aristoteles kan ha bidragit till att ha gjort honom ideologiskt suspekt i somligas ögon, så är det viktigt att skilja på den aristoteliska metafysiken och den aristoteliska moralfilosofin. Den förra var ju en viktig grund för den världsbild som Nikolaus Copernicus och hans efterföljare såg till att avskaffa, medan den senare blev föremål för uppskattande studier från renässanshumanisternas sida. Aristoteles talade om arete, tidigare ofta översatt som ’dygd’, medan senare översättningar föredragit ’förträfflighet’, ’duglighet’ eller ’förtjänstfullhet’. Han ansåg att lycka (eudaimonia) är människans högsta mål. För att tala om moraliskt handlande måste man förutsätta aktörens frihet, att det goda inte är bestämt på förhand. Men för att kunna välja det goda måste man ha arete. Denna egenskap uppnår man genom övning i måttfullhet, ”den gyllene medelvägen”, dvs. en balans mellan övermod och feghet, slöseri och snikenhet, tygellöshet och känslolöshet, etc. För den som händelsevis inte uppskattar vare sig tyska eller grekiska filosofer, så kan liknande tankar återfinnas inom den buddhistiska traditionen. Böcker av Dalai lama är ju i våra dagar tämligen lättillgängliga.

    Avslutningsvis kan Bengt Kristensson Ugglas Slaget om verkligheten (2002) rekommenderas. Det är en omvärldsanalys som lyfter fram hermeneutiken, ”konsten att tolka”, som en viktig strategisk kompetens i vår postindustriella, postmoderna och globaliserade värld. Där renässanshumanismen relaterar till reformationen och den vetenskapliga revolutionen; nyhumanismen hänger samman med upplysningen, human- och samhällsvetenskapernas framväxt samt de omfattande sociala och politiska omvälvningar som följde på franska revolutionen; likaledes kan den humanism som behövs för vår tid bara förstås mot bakgrund av vår tids förutsättningar. Som von Wright påpekat, så kan historiska kulturer som det antika Grekland eller Indien vara för annorlunda för att erbjuda lösningar för oss västerlänningar idag. Varje tid och varje kultur har sina problemformuleringar. Dock kan studierna av det Annorlunda lära oss att ställa frågorna på andra sätt än de invanda. Vem vet om vi då inte också kan nå fram till mer produktiva svar? Den västerländska kanon måste ge vika för det som Goethe kallade ”världslitteratur” – annars kan inte humanismen vara annat än konservativ. Det sant humanistiska ligger i en ständig beredskap att tänka om, att bildning aldrig kan vara någonting färdigt.
    Litteratur

    Då jag inte använt mig av notsystem eller litteraturhänvisningar i vanlig mening, även om ett flertal böcker omnämnts, så är följande förteckning att betrakta som tips för vidare läsning:

    Ahlberg , Alf, Humanismen: Historiska perspektiv och nutida synpunkter (1951), Dualis Förlag, Ludvika 1992.

    Aristoteles , Den nikomachiska etiken, översatt av Mårten Ringbom, Bokförlaget Daidalos, Göteborg 2004.

    Azar , Michael, Frihet, jämlikhet, brodermord: Revolution och kolonialism hos Albert Camus och Frantz Fanon , Brutus Östlings bokförlag Symposion, Stockholm/Stehag 2001.

    Camus , Albert, Myten om Sisyfos ( Le mythe de Sisyphe , 1942), översatt av Gunnar Brandell och Bengt John, Albert Bonniers Förlag, Stockholm 2004.

    * Människans revolt ( L’homme révolté , 1953), översatt av Gunnar Brandell, Albert Bonniers Förlag, Stockholm 2002.

    Condorcet , de, Marquis, Människosläktets andliga förkovran ( Esquisse d’un tableau historique des progrès de l’esprit humain , 1793), översatt av Arne Klum, Carlssons Bokförlag, Stockholm 2002.

    Dalai lama , Etik för ett nytt millennium (Ethics for the New Millennium, 1999), översatt av Alf Galvensjö, Egmont Richter, Malmö 2000.

    Fukuyama , Francis, Historiens slut och den sista människan ( The End of History and the Last Man , 1992), översatt av Staffan Andræ, Norstedts Förlag, Stockholm 1992.

    Gulyga , Arsenij, Immanuel Kant ( Kant , 1977), översatt av Håkan Edgren, Bokförlaget Daidalos, Göteborg 1988.

    Kant , Immanuel, ”Svar på frågan: Vad är upplysning?” ( Beantwortung der Frage: Was ist Aufklärung? 1784), ur Östling, Brutus (red.), Vad är upplysning? Kant, Foucault, Habermas, Mendelssohn, Heidegren , översatt av Ulf Peter Hallberg et al., Brutus Östlings bokförlag Symposion, Stockholm/Stehag 1992.

    Kristensson Uggla , Bengt, Slaget om verkligheten: Filosofi – omvärldsanalys – tolkning , Brutus Östlings bokförlag Symposion, Stockholm/Stehag 2002.

    Kurtz , Paul, ”Humanistiskt manifest 2000: Ett upprop för en ny världsomfattande humanism” ( Humanist Manifesto 2000 ), översatt av Lars Torstensson, http://www.humanisterna.org/HumManifest2000.html

    Liedman , Sven-Eric, Ett oändligt äventyr: Om människans kunskaper , Albert Bonniers Förlag, Stockholm 2001.

    Mendelssohn , Moses, ”Om frågan: Vad innebär upplysning?” ( Über die Frage: was heisst aufklären? 1784), ur Östling, Brutus (red.), Vad är upplysning? Kant, Foucault, Habermas, Mendelssohn, Heidegren , översatt av Ulf Peter Hallberg et al., Brutus Östlings bokförlag Symposion, Stockholm/Stehag 1992.

    Schöldberg , Charlotta, ”Martin Heidegger om individualitet och det egna”, ur Glänta 1-2/2001.

    Sartre , Jean-Paul, Existentialismen är en humanism ( L’existentialisme est un humanisme , 1946), översatt av Arne Häggqvist, Albert Bonniers Förlag, Stockholm 2002.

    Weber , Max, Den protestantiska etiken och kapitalismens anda ( Die Protestantische Ethik und der Geist des Kapitalismus , 1904), översatt av Agne Lundquist, Argos Bokförlag, Lund 1978.

    Wright , von, Georg Henrik, Humanismen som livshållning och andra essayer (1978), Månpocket, 1996.

    * Vetenskapen och förnuftet: Ett försök till orientering (1986), Albert Bonniers Förlag, Stockholm 2000.
    * Myten om framsteget: Tankar 1987-1992 med en intellektuell självbiografi (1993), Månpocket 1996.

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    Lars

    2007, 1 november kl 21:16

  24. Citat från Lars inlägg 2007/11/01 kl. 21:16:34:

    ”Det sant humanistiska ligger i en ständig beredskap att tänka om, att bildning aldrig kan vara någonting färdigt.”

    Så sant, så sant, men man får inte glömma att om viljan att tänka om beror på rädsla, tvång eller opportunism, så är det inte värt ett ruttet lingon.

    It takes two to tango!

    Och det är väl där problemet ligger som vanligt, ingen vill sänka garden för ingen litar på någon…

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    Gote

    2007, 1 november kl 22:19

  25. Hej Lars!

    Jag har själv läst Aristoteles, Den nikomachiske etik, och anser att den har lika högt läsvärde idag som för 2300 år sedan. Även om omständigheterna skiftar så har vi inte förändrats så mycket som mäniskor, något som jag tycker man märker när man läser tankarna till antika människor.
    Det mänskliga psyket och förnuftet förhåller sig på samma sätt med nutidsmänniskan som med den antika människa, efter min mening, och det är en bok som jag har tagit stort intryck av!

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    Christer Eriksson

    2007, 1 november kl 22:24

  26. Lars

    Ps. Tack för en ytterst fin resume om filosofins historia Ds.

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    Christer Eriksson

    2007, 2 november kl 01:40

  27. Trevligt att min gamla essä (”Humanitet, förnuft och bildning”, se kommentar XXIII ovan) blivit uppmärksammad! Men hade det inte räck med en länk?

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    Jimmy

    2008, 21 januari kl 10:51

  28. I want to quote your post in my blog. It can?
    And you et an account on Twitter?

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    ClockworkRus

    2009, 25 december kl 11:16

  29. ClockworkRus. You canquote as you like. I have an account on Twitter.

      (Citera)  (Svara)

    Lars

    2009, 26 december kl 13:41

Skriv en kommentar


fem + = tio

Konst bloggar